Glossary

Glossary of Terms and NCED Attribute Descriptions

Site Name
The common name used by the property or easement holder to identify the conservation easement. For example, it could be the name of the street the easement is on, the name of the property owner, the name of a business that may be associated with the property, or the name of the organization or individual that acts as the property manager. This is an optional field, but will be helpful in identifying specific easements associated with easement holders.

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Conservation Easement Holder
The name of the organization, tribe, agency, or business that has been granted legal rights by the landowner for use and/or management of the property.

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Conservation Easement Holder Type
The type of organization that holds the conservation easement. The portal provides a drop down list of options for data providers to choose from. Options include:
  • Federal - Federal agencies such as the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Forest Service, or U.S. Department of Transportation.
  • Native American - Tribal or First Nation Territories such as the Navajo, Umpqua or Lakota Tribes.
  • State - State agencies such as a state wildlife or game, natural resources, or state lands agency.
  • Regional Agency - Agencies that are smaller than a state agency, but larger than a county agency; it does not refer to a regional office of a national or state agency. Examples include a council of governments or a metro regional district that encompasses more than one city.
  • Local Government - examples include county agency or a city
  • Non-Governmental Organization – An organization that operates independently from any government and typically is considered a charitable organization. Examples include land trusts and The Nature Conservancy.
  • Private – An individual person or company/business.
  • Jointly Held
  • Unknown landowner - Information is not available to determine the holder type.
  • Territorial

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Landowner Type
The NCED does not include landowner’s names for privacy considerations but, if available, the NCED is interested in capturing the type of landowner. This information can be helpful for conservation planning and decision making purposes. The portal provides a drop down list of options for data providers to choose from. Options include:
  • Federal - Federal agencies such as the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Forest Service, or U.S. Department of Transportation
  • Native American - Tribal or First Nation Territories
  • State - State agencies such as a state wildlife or game, natural resources, or state lands agency.
  • Regional Agency - Agencies that are smaller than a state agency, but larger than a county agency; it does not refer to a regional office of a national or state agency. Examples include a council of governments or a metro regional district that encompasses more than one city.
  • Local Government - examples include county agency or a city
  • Non-Governmental Organization - An organization that operates independently from any government and typically is considered a charitable organization. Examples include The Nature Conservancy and land trusts.
  • Private– An individual person or company/business.
  • Jointly owned
  • Unknown landowner - Information is not available to determine the landowner type.
  • Territorial

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Conservation Purpose
The term “conservation purpose” refers to the definitions under Section 170(h) of the Internal Revenue Service tax code that qualifies an easement for tax benefits. It is the primary purpose of the easement. The portal provides a drop down list for data providers to choose from. The categories include the following:

  • Recreation or Education – The preservation of land areas for outdoor recreation by, or for the education of, the general public.
  • Environmental System – The protection of a relatively natural habitat of fish, wildlife, or plants, or similar ecosystem.
  • Historic Preservation – The preservation of a historically important land area or a certified historic structure; a historic structure is any building, structure, or land area which is listed in the National Register, or is located in a registered historic district and is certified by the Secretary of the Interior as being of historic significance to the district.
  • Open Space (Farm, Ranch, Forest, or Other) – The preservation of open space where such preservation is for the scenic enjoyment of the general public, or pursuant to a clearly delineated Federal, State, or local governmental conservation policy, and will yield a significant public benefit.
  • Unknown – Information is not available to determine the purpose of the conservation easement.

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Public Access
The level of public access allowed to the conservation easement. The portal provides a drop down list of options for data providers to choose from. Options include:
  • Open Access – Public access is permitted on the conservation easement without restriction.
  • Restricted Access – Public access is permitted on the conservation easement with some restriction(s). For example, part of the property could be closed to public access or hours of public access could be limited.
  • Closed – Public access is not permitted on the conservation easement.
  • Unknown - Information is not available to determine the level of public access permitted.

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Duration
The duration or length of time a property will be under a conservation easement. The portal provides a drop down list of options for data providers to choose from. Options include:
  • Permanent – The legal right to the easement is granted in perpetuity. It is not subject to termination.
  • Temporary – The legal right to the easement is granted for a specified period of time. If this option is chosen, a data provider is given the ability to indicate the specified number of years the property will be under easement.
  • Unknown – Information is not available to determine the duration of the easement.

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Acquisition Date
The date (day, month, and year) a conservation easement was acquired.

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Conservation Registry Projects
Projects entered through the Conservation Registry.

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